running time: 58 minutes | 2013


"For all the cultures that settled throughout history on the northern Adriatic coast, it willbe possible to ascribe at least one monument of architectonic heritage or some otherartifact witnessing its presence.”
 - Anton Gnirs, 1911


The Austrian archaeologist, Anton Gnirs, made this statement about the cluster of islands that line the Croatian coast in 1911, when the Austro-Hungarian still ruled Croatia.  Gnirs’s insistence on the region’s historical importance hoped to inspire the preservation of some 5000 years worth of cultural heritage.  Constructed in 1963, 52 years after Gnirs’s statement, the beach resort Guest House Helios is an artifact of its time, a witness of Yugoslavian Communism.  Bearing the same name as its subject, Guest House Helios, this film follows the day-to-day operations of the hotel during one of its final seasons before its scheduled closure and demolition in 2014.  Long after the breakup of Yugoslavia, this film documents how the guests and workers of this hotel engage within a structure of hospitality built upon the principles of Yugoslavian Socialism - only now within the conditions of present day capitalism.  Located off the Istria peninsula on the island of Lošinj, over the past century this region of Croatia has remained a travel destination under each major form of modern government, from the Austrian Monarchy’s imperialism, to Italian fascism, Yugoslavian socialism, and now neoliberal capitalism.  Each of these forms of governmentality imprinted its interpretation of heath, leisure and tourism, in the architectural forms of the successive hotels that remain and operate on the island.  Today resort hotels are sites that invite visitors to leave their jobs and daily routines behind on the premise that in the act of leisure, people can be their true selves.  Providing this service is an economic livelihood for the island’s residents, offering up local cultural ‘authenticity’ for leisured consumption.  Consequently, as the pressures of neoliberal capitalism force market expansion, the requirement for continuous growth simultaneously threatens to erode this cultural ‘authenticity’ that defines the region, and which tourism relies upon.  This cataloging of the seemingly mundane gestures of a hotel’s daily routine, places the notion of objective ethnographic representation within the tension between self-representation and a representation that is imposed by another.  Within this tension lies the potential to illustrate the contradiction that tourism offers to cultural identity, as it relies on cultural particularities while simultaneously threatening to flatten them.

running time: 58 minutes | 2013

"For all the cultures that settled throughout history on the northern Adriatic coast, it willbe possible to ascribe at least one monument of architectonic heritage or some otherartifact witnessing its presence.”

 - Anton Gnirs, 1911

The Austrian archaeologist, Anton Gnirs, made this statement about the cluster of islands that line the Croatian coast in 1911, when the Austro-Hungarian still ruled Croatia.  Gnirs’s insistence on the region’s historical importance hoped to inspire the preservation of some 5000 years worth of cultural heritage.  Constructed in 1963, 52 years after Gnirs’s statement, the beach resort Guest House Helios is an artifact of its time, a witness of Yugoslavian Communism.  Bearing the same name as its subject, Guest House Helios, this film follows the day-to-day operations of the hotel during one of its final seasons before its scheduled closure and demolition in 2014.  Long after the breakup of Yugoslavia, this film documents how the guests and workers of this hotel engage within a structure of hospitality built upon the principles of Yugoslavian Socialism - only now within the conditions of present day capitalism.  Located off the Istria peninsula on the island of Lošinj, over the past century this region of Croatia has remained a travel destination under each major form of modern government, from the Austrian Monarchy’s imperialism, to Italian fascism, Yugoslavian socialism, and now neoliberal capitalism.  Each of these forms of governmentality imprinted its interpretation of heath, leisure and tourism, in the architectural forms of the successive hotels that remain and operate on the island.  Today resort hotels are sites that invite visitors to leave their jobs and daily routines behind on the premise that in the act of leisure, people can be their true selves.  Providing this service is an economic livelihood for the island’s residents, offering up local cultural ‘authenticity’ for leisured consumption.  Consequently, as the pressures of neoliberal capitalism force market expansion, the requirement for continuous growth simultaneously threatens to erode this cultural ‘authenticity’ that defines the region, and which tourism relies upon.  This cataloging of the seemingly mundane gestures of a hotel’s daily routine, places the notion of objective ethnographic representation within the tension between self-representation and a representation that is imposed by another.  Within this tension lies the potential to illustrate the contradiction that tourism offers to cultural identity, as it relies on cultural particularities while simultaneously threatening to flatten them.

Virág Bogyo & Ryan Jeffery

The German government’s intervention made the 1958 version of Le Corbusier’s Unité d’habtitation, the most compromised of the architect’s vision for unified living.  Though the building is counted as one of the five structures of the architect’s modernist residential manifesto between 1947 and 1965, Le Corbusier refused any association with the Berlin Unité d’habtitation as a result of Government restriction.  Presented here are five methods to calculate and quantify the effected loss of ideal living on the building’s inhabitants.

short film / installation     Dogpalm, CA     3 minutes  16mm stills (watch clip)
An artifact of an incomplete memoir of a Californian Dream. The opportunity that lies west and lingers in the sun drenched light of an impossible promise which exists in the fictional place of Dogpalm, CA.
featuring music by Benoit Pioulard

short film / installation     Dogpalm, CA     3 minutes  16mm stills (watch clip)

An artifact of an incomplete memoir of a Californian Dream. The opportunity that lies west and lingers in the sun drenched light of an impossible promise which exists in the fictional place of Dogpalm, CA.

featuring music by Benoit Pioulard

short film     The Practice of Living      8 min
A young man follows the step - by - step process of illegally squatting a  property through the use of an instructional audio CD which details the  confrontation between the ideas of squatting culture and the ideas of  land ownership.
The burst of the United States housing bubble in 2008 cast thousands of Americans out of their homes and fractured the supposed stability of the global financial system.  With little to no connection to activist squatting culture, hundreds of U.S. citizens took it upon themselves to take shelter in the surplus of vacated houses suddenly available.  The character presented in the film follows the logistical steps required to squat an abandoned property but his motivations lack either the desperation of homelessness or the militance of activism.  In the absence of any apparent crisis this squatter brings a carefree ambivalence to the reality of his situation.  As he follows the step-by-step instructions to squatting, what remains are the mundane actions required to inhabit a space outside the imagination of land ownership and private property. 
starring Joe Haege
(currently in festival circulation video soon)

short film     The Practice of Living      8 min

A young man follows the step - by - step process of illegally squatting a property through the use of an instructional audio CD which details the confrontation between the ideas of squatting culture and the ideas of land ownership.

The burst of the United States housing bubble in 2008 cast thousands of Americans out of
their homes and fractured the supposed stability of the global financial system.  With
little to no connection to activist squatting culture, hundreds of U.S. citizens took it upon
themselves to take shelter in the surplus of vacated houses suddenly available.  The
character presented in the film follows the logistical steps required to squat an abandoned
property but his motivations lack either the desperation of homelessness or the militance
of activism.  In the absence of any apparent crisis this squatter brings a carefree
ambivalence to the reality of his situation.  As he follows the step-by-step instructions to
squatting, what remains are the mundane actions required to inhabit a space outside the
imagination of land ownership and private property.


starring Joe Haege

(currently in festival circulation video soon)

short film     we’re almost there     16mm print  1 minute  watch
A letter written by grandmother to my parents when I was born in 1978.

short film     we’re almost there     16mm print  1 minute  watch

A letter written by grandmother to my parents when I was born in 1978.

music video    Tu Fawning     I know you now     cityslang records  watch

music video    Tu Fawning     I know you now     cityslang records  watch

music video    Benoit Pioulard    ragged tint    kranky records  watch

music video    Benoit Pioulard    ragged tint    kranky records  watch

music video    D.M. Stith     pity dance    asthmatic kitty records  watch

music video    D.M. Stith     pity dance    asthmatic kitty records  watch

music video     Alela Diane     as white as diamonds     roughtrade records  watch

music video     Alela Diane     as white as diamonds     roughtrade records  watch

music video    Laura Gibson & Ethan Rose     younger     holocene records,
headz records  watch

music video    Laura Gibson & Ethan Rose     younger     holocene records,

headz records  watch

running time: 58 minutes | 2013


"For all the cultures that settled throughout history on the northern Adriatic coast, it willbe possible to ascribe at least one monument of architectonic heritage or some otherartifact witnessing its presence.”
 - Anton Gnirs, 1911


The Austrian archaeologist, Anton Gnirs, made this statement about the cluster of islands that line the Croatian coast in 1911, when the Austro-Hungarian still ruled Croatia.  Gnirs’s insistence on the region’s historical importance hoped to inspire the preservation of some 5000 years worth of cultural heritage.  Constructed in 1963, 52 years after Gnirs’s statement, the beach resort Guest House Helios is an artifact of its time, a witness of Yugoslavian Communism.  Bearing the same name as its subject, Guest House Helios, this film follows the day-to-day operations of the hotel during one of its final seasons before its scheduled closure and demolition in 2014.  Long after the breakup of Yugoslavia, this film documents how the guests and workers of this hotel engage within a structure of hospitality built upon the principles of Yugoslavian Socialism - only now within the conditions of present day capitalism.  Located off the Istria peninsula on the island of Lošinj, over the past century this region of Croatia has remained a travel destination under each major form of modern government, from the Austrian Monarchy’s imperialism, to Italian fascism, Yugoslavian socialism, and now neoliberal capitalism.  Each of these forms of governmentality imprinted its interpretation of heath, leisure and tourism, in the architectural forms of the successive hotels that remain and operate on the island.  Today resort hotels are sites that invite visitors to leave their jobs and daily routines behind on the premise that in the act of leisure, people can be their true selves.  Providing this service is an economic livelihood for the island’s residents, offering up local cultural ‘authenticity’ for leisured consumption.  Consequently, as the pressures of neoliberal capitalism force market expansion, the requirement for continuous growth simultaneously threatens to erode this cultural ‘authenticity’ that defines the region, and which tourism relies upon.  This cataloging of the seemingly mundane gestures of a hotel’s daily routine, places the notion of objective ethnographic representation within the tension between self-representation and a representation that is imposed by another.  Within this tension lies the potential to illustrate the contradiction that tourism offers to cultural identity, as it relies on cultural particularities while simultaneously threatening to flatten them.

running time: 58 minutes | 2013

"For all the cultures that settled throughout history on the northern Adriatic coast, it willbe possible to ascribe at least one monument of architectonic heritage or some otherartifact witnessing its presence.”

 - Anton Gnirs, 1911

The Austrian archaeologist, Anton Gnirs, made this statement about the cluster of islands that line the Croatian coast in 1911, when the Austro-Hungarian still ruled Croatia.  Gnirs’s insistence on the region’s historical importance hoped to inspire the preservation of some 5000 years worth of cultural heritage.  Constructed in 1963, 52 years after Gnirs’s statement, the beach resort Guest House Helios is an artifact of its time, a witness of Yugoslavian Communism.  Bearing the same name as its subject, Guest House Helios, this film follows the day-to-day operations of the hotel during one of its final seasons before its scheduled closure and demolition in 2014.  Long after the breakup of Yugoslavia, this film documents how the guests and workers of this hotel engage within a structure of hospitality built upon the principles of Yugoslavian Socialism - only now within the conditions of present day capitalism.  Located off the Istria peninsula on the island of Lošinj, over the past century this region of Croatia has remained a travel destination under each major form of modern government, from the Austrian Monarchy’s imperialism, to Italian fascism, Yugoslavian socialism, and now neoliberal capitalism.  Each of these forms of governmentality imprinted its interpretation of heath, leisure and tourism, in the architectural forms of the successive hotels that remain and operate on the island.  Today resort hotels are sites that invite visitors to leave their jobs and daily routines behind on the premise that in the act of leisure, people can be their true selves.  Providing this service is an economic livelihood for the island’s residents, offering up local cultural ‘authenticity’ for leisured consumption.  Consequently, as the pressures of neoliberal capitalism force market expansion, the requirement for continuous growth simultaneously threatens to erode this cultural ‘authenticity’ that defines the region, and which tourism relies upon.  This cataloging of the seemingly mundane gestures of a hotel’s daily routine, places the notion of objective ethnographic representation within the tension between self-representation and a representation that is imposed by another.  Within this tension lies the potential to illustrate the contradiction that tourism offers to cultural identity, as it relies on cultural particularities while simultaneously threatening to flatten them.

Virág Bogyo & Ryan Jeffery

The German government’s intervention made the 1958 version of Le Corbusier’s Unité d’habtitation, the most compromised of the architect’s vision for unified living.  Though the building is counted as one of the five structures of the architect’s modernist residential manifesto between 1947 and 1965, Le Corbusier refused any association with the Berlin Unité d’habtitation as a result of Government restriction.  Presented here are five methods to calculate and quantify the effected loss of ideal living on the building’s inhabitants.

short film / installation     Dogpalm, CA     3 minutes  16mm stills (watch clip)
An artifact of an incomplete memoir of a Californian Dream. The opportunity that lies west and lingers in the sun drenched light of an impossible promise which exists in the fictional place of Dogpalm, CA.
featuring music by Benoit Pioulard

short film / installation     Dogpalm, CA     3 minutes  16mm stills (watch clip)

An artifact of an incomplete memoir of a Californian Dream. The opportunity that lies west and lingers in the sun drenched light of an impossible promise which exists in the fictional place of Dogpalm, CA.

featuring music by Benoit Pioulard

short film     The Practice of Living      8 min
A young man follows the step - by - step process of illegally squatting a  property through the use of an instructional audio CD which details the  confrontation between the ideas of squatting culture and the ideas of  land ownership.
The burst of the United States housing bubble in 2008 cast thousands of Americans out of their homes and fractured the supposed stability of the global financial system.  With little to no connection to activist squatting culture, hundreds of U.S. citizens took it upon themselves to take shelter in the surplus of vacated houses suddenly available.  The character presented in the film follows the logistical steps required to squat an abandoned property but his motivations lack either the desperation of homelessness or the militance of activism.  In the absence of any apparent crisis this squatter brings a carefree ambivalence to the reality of his situation.  As he follows the step-by-step instructions to squatting, what remains are the mundane actions required to inhabit a space outside the imagination of land ownership and private property. 
starring Joe Haege
(currently in festival circulation video soon)

short film     The Practice of Living      8 min

A young man follows the step - by - step process of illegally squatting a property through the use of an instructional audio CD which details the confrontation between the ideas of squatting culture and the ideas of land ownership.

The burst of the United States housing bubble in 2008 cast thousands of Americans out of
their homes and fractured the supposed stability of the global financial system.  With
little to no connection to activist squatting culture, hundreds of U.S. citizens took it upon
themselves to take shelter in the surplus of vacated houses suddenly available.  The
character presented in the film follows the logistical steps required to squat an abandoned
property but his motivations lack either the desperation of homelessness or the militance
of activism.  In the absence of any apparent crisis this squatter brings a carefree
ambivalence to the reality of his situation.  As he follows the step-by-step instructions to
squatting, what remains are the mundane actions required to inhabit a space outside the
imagination of land ownership and private property.


starring Joe Haege

(currently in festival circulation video soon)

short film     we’re almost there     16mm print  1 minute  watch
A letter written by grandmother to my parents when I was born in 1978.

short film     we’re almost there     16mm print  1 minute  watch

A letter written by grandmother to my parents when I was born in 1978.

music video    Tu Fawning     I know you now     cityslang records  watch

music video    Tu Fawning     I know you now     cityslang records  watch

music video    Benoit Pioulard    ragged tint    kranky records  watch

music video    Benoit Pioulard    ragged tint    kranky records  watch

music video    D.M. Stith     pity dance    asthmatic kitty records  watch

music video    D.M. Stith     pity dance    asthmatic kitty records  watch

music video     Alela Diane     as white as diamonds     roughtrade records  watch

music video     Alela Diane     as white as diamonds     roughtrade records  watch

music video    Laura Gibson & Ethan Rose     younger     holocene records,
headz records  watch

music video    Laura Gibson & Ethan Rose     younger     holocene records,

headz records  watch

About:

Ryan Jeffery is an artist and filmmaker born Fairfax Virginia, United States. His films and videos have screened at such festivals as the Optica Film Festival, Sonar Festival, Festival Nouveau Cinema, 5 Days Off, and the International Short Film Festival Leuven. Jeffery has studied at the Universitär der Künste in Berlin and is currently completing his MFA at the California Institute of the Arts in Los Angeles CA.
contact ryansjeffery@gmail.com